. . .

Based on historical records, solar panel technology even existed in the 18th century, precisely in 1839 a French physicist named Alexandre Edmund Becquerel’s first coined solar panel technology. Initially, the solar panel technology was first coined by him through an experiment of irradiation of two electrodes using various light spectrums that produce the photovoltaic effect. Photovoltaic (Photo = light and voltaic = electrical voltage) is the process of forming electrical energy from light energy. But at that time, the amount of electrical energy produced was too small and easily exhausted. Fortunately, the modern ones, like solar Panels in Busselton are capable of producing a lot of power.

Then in 1876, a teacher named William Grylls Adam and his student Richards Evans Day strengthened Alexandre Edmund Becquerel’s research which revealed that in this world there are solid material objects, namely selenium which can produce electrical energy when selenium is exposed to certain rays. Although it only produces a small amount of electrical energy, this experiment also proves that electrical energy can be produced from light energy.

In 1904, Albert Einstein once researched solar cells and he named the experiment with the name Photoelectric Effect. It was only in 1941, a researcher named Russell Ohl succeeded in developing solar panel technology as well as patenting the product. He is known as the first person to invent solar cell technology (solar panels) and the use of solar panels he made is still used today.

In making solar panels, he needs silicon. A solar panel can produce electricity because of the semiconductor material inside such as silicon. When silicon comes in direct contact with light, it can cause reactions that later produce electrical energy.

Based on the latest data reveals that the earth is expected to experience an energy crisis in 2060 due to the depletion of oil. For this reason, researchers today are competing to find alternative materials, one of which is by utilizing solar energy to produce energy.

Japan even has utilized solar panel technology since the 1980s or about 3 decades ago, then followed by developed countries in Europe and America. The use of solar cells has also penetrated the automotive and gadget sectors, such as the manufacture of solar cars and solar power banks.